Posts Categorized: Seller Articles

Selling Your Business? Do-It-Yourself is Risky Business!

When the owner of a business makes the decision to sell, he or she is taking a giant step that involves the emotions as well as the marketplace, each with its own set of complexities. Those sellers who are tempted to undertake the transaction on their own should understand both the process and the emotional environment that this process is set against. The steps outlined below are just some of the items for a successful sale. While these might seem daunting to the do-it-yourselfer, by engaging the help of a business intermediary, the seller can feel confident about what is often one of the major decisions of a lifetime.

1. Set the stage.

What kind of impression will the business make on prospective buyers? The seller may be happy with a weathered sign (the rustic look) or weeds poking up through the pavement (the natural look), but the buyer might only think, “What a mess!” Equally problematic can be improvements planned by the seller that appeal to his or her sense of aesthetics but that will, in fact, do nothing to benefit the sale. Instead of guessing what might make a difference and what might not, sellers would be wise to seek the advice of a business broker–a professional with experience in dealing regularly with buyers and with an eye experienced in properly setting the business scene.

2. Get the record(s) straight.

Although outward appearance does count, what’s inside the books is even more important. Ultimately, a business will sell according to the numbers. The business broker can offer the seller invaluable assistance in the presentation of the financials.

3. Weigh price against value.

All sellers naturally want to get the best possible price for their business. However, they also need to be realistic. To determine the best price, a business broker will use industry-tested pricing techniques that include ratios based on sales of similar businesses, as well as historical data on the type of business for sale.

4. Market professionally.

Engaging the services of a business broker is the key to the successful marketing of a business. The business broker will prepare a marketing strategy and offer advice about essential marketing tools–everything from a business description to media advertising. Through their professional networks and access to data on prospective buyers, business brokers can get the word out about the business far more effectively than any owner could manage on an individual basis.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

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Why the Future of Your Business Is Critical to Its Value

As a business owner, you’re likely proud of the results you’ve achieved in the past, but when it comes to the value of your business, your future is critical. That’s why your growth potential is one of eight factors that drive the value of your business.

One metric that acquirers may use to evaluate your growth potential is your revenue per employee.

Alphabet (Google’s parent company) generates around $1.3 million in revenue per employee. Compare that to the advertising agency WPP Group, whose average revenue per employee is around $100,000. For every dollar of revenue, WPP needs more than ten times the employees than Alphabet does.

It takes time to recruit, train, and motivate people, which is why WPP has grown more slowly and suffers much lower valuations when compared to a less people-heavy company.

Measuring your revenue per employee is just one of many ways an investor may evaluate how quickly they are likely to grow your company.

Looking Skyward

For an example of some of the other ways acquirers assess your growth potential, take a look at Verizon’s recent acquisition of Skyward. Jonathan Evans started Skyward in 2012 when he spotted companies like Amazon and Walmart using drones for package delivery. Evans was working as an air ambulance helicopter pilot and realized widespread use of drones would eventually create air safety issues.

Evans saw an opportunity where others hadn’t and launched Skyward to develop software that could safely route drone traffic. While he wasn’t a programmer, his extensive aviation experience enabled him to understand how the current airspace management guidelines could be turned into applications that created “digital train tracks” for drones.

Early adopters like utility, construction, and media companies used Skyward’s software to manage their drone fleets. Investors also came calling. Within a few years, Skyward had raised approximately $8 million.

One of those investors was Verizon. Drones would require fast and reliable Internet connectivity to operate safely, and the telecom giant wanted a piece of the future. Airbus came calling too, and when Verizon heard of the aerospace corporation’s interest, they leaped into action and offered to buy the company. For Evans, marrying his nascent technology to the country’s largest telecommunications giant was an ideal match.

Within days, Evans had sold Skyward to Verizon for top dollar. Investors enjoyed returns of between three and five times their original investment.

Given the growth of the industrial drone market, Verizon knew Skyward had the potential to expand quickly as significant companies started to adopt drones. Verizon also understood that as Skyward grew, so too would the customer’s need for Verizon’s data because drones rely on a data connection to communicate with the ground.

No matter what business you’re in, the critical takeaway is to remember that the value of your business is determined less by what you have done in the past and more by what you will likely do in the future.

 

How can you improve the value of your business?

Complete the “Value Builder” questionnaire today in just 13 minutes and we’ll send you a 27-page custom report assessing how well your business is positioned for selling. Take the test now:

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Every Business Owner NEEDS a Solid Exit Strategy

Why it makes sense no matter the stage of your business…

This is part one of a two part series on why every business owner should take the time to develop a solid exit strategy.

Exit planning can seem like a useless process until the business owner decides it’s time to exit the business. After all, why in the world would a business owner want to put himself through that effort before it’s really needed?

Let me tick off a few reasons…

  • #1 – it takes longer than most business owners think
  • #2 – improving the value of the business doesn’t happen overnight – it takes time
  • #3 – planning dramatically improves the outcome when the time comes

I could go on…

A well-designed exit strategy opens the doors to possibilities. It can provide options where none previously existed. Most business owners don’t even realize what options they have for exit, but if they build a genuinely valuable enterprise, the options increase exponentially.

In fact, the most important outcome of good exit planning is that a business owner can define the process on their own terms. Transitioning on their terms along with not falling victim to the process helps business owners avoid “risk factors” which is code for lower valuations!

A solid and properly executed exit strategy has at least the following components:

  • Identifies and removes risks, some of which may be in the owner’s blind spot
  • Provides opportunities to increase enterprise value
  • Aligns people to function on the same page
  • Provides contingency plans for unforeseen issues

Let’s address each of these benefits briefly.

De-Risking

We all have blind spots. If we know where those blond spots are, we can address and resolve them. There are things like having shareholder and operating agreements and a solid buy-sell agreement if there are multiple shareholders. Many business owners realize they need those but think they will deal with them later and soon forget. Business insurance policies that were set up years prior, and automatically renewed without review, may need to be updated with things like business interruption, cyber security and key man insurance. These issues are all behind the scenes items, but we should also think about other risks in our business that might be easy to solve, like customer or supplier concentration risk and documented processes.

A great exit plan includes finding and addressing these risks in a business, ultimately leading to higher valuations. You can read more about risks in my book – Maximize Business Value or download the free e-book The Blind Spot: Hidden Risks – What You Don’t Know Can Hurt Youon our website – masterypartners.com.

Creating Massive Value

Great exit strategies include building long-term, sustainable value in the business. This strategy is the component that is missing from most exit strategies, because by the time you actually start taking action on selling, you’re within a year or two of your exit event. That’s just simply too late to increase the value of your business. Building massive value or increasing the value you already have in your business takes time.

Sophisticated buyers won’t believe short term improvements in value. You’ll need to have a solid track record, usually in the form of trailing twelve months (TTM), to demonstrate that what you’ve done is sustainable, and not some short-term blip on the radar. In most cases, it will take several quarters, perhaps even a few years, until all the things you’ve done to build massive value finally make their way to your financial statements and valuation. Let me state this again… IT JUST TAKES TIME!

Aligning People

Most business owners don’t want their employees to know that they are thinking about selling the business. That’s why it’s one of the strongest arguments for exit strategy being good business strategy. When you approach an exit as a business strategy to build value in the business, involving your team is as natural as involving them in their daily job functions. When you set out to improve long term value, you won’t be shy about who knows because a more valuable business attracts the right people to work there.

Finally – let’s talk a little about the unthinkable…

No business owner likes to think about those things that will suddenly and dramatically change their business. We summarize them easily as the 5 D’s: death, disability, divorce, distress and disagreement. Every business should have a plan for what happens in the case of death or disability of the business owner or other key people. Life happens. It is very possible that you or a key member of your staff will become disabled. Ask yourself this question – “If something happens to me, will my family be provided for, and can the business operate without missing a beat?” If you’re like most business owners, that’s one that will stop you in your tracks.

Distress comes in many forms, like a large customer serving notice that they are leaving you or a key employee turning in two weeks’ notice, or a breach of your systems exposing your customer’s data. I could go on and on. And although never a pleasant topic, the divorce of a business owner or shareholder will likely trigger unintended consequences unless you’re prepared for it. All of these would impact a business to a far greater extent than most owners are prepared. An exit plan provides contingencies for these situations, reducing their negative consequences.

So, Stop right now and go download the eBook. You’ll be glad you did!

Next week – we’re going to talk about common myths and misconceptions about business value and exit planning. You won’t want to miss it!

This article is provided courtesy of Tom Bronson. Tom is the founder and President of Mastery Partners, a company that helps business owners maximize business value, design exit strategy, and transition their business on their terms.  To learn more about Mastery Partners, visit the website – https://www.masterypartners.com/

What a Buyer May Really Be Looking At

Buyers, as part of their due diligence, usually employ accountants to check the numbers and attorneys to both look at legal issues and draft or review documents. Buyers may also bring in other professionals to look at the business’ operations. The prudent buyer is also looking behind the scenes to make sure there are not any “skeletons in the closet.” It makes sense for a seller to be just as prudent. Knowing what the prudent buyer may be checking can be a big help. A business intermediary professional is a good person to help a seller look at these issues. They are very familiar with what buyers are looking for when considering a company to purchase.

Here are some examples of things that a prudent buyer will be checking:

Finance

  • Is the business taking all of the trade discounts available or is it late in paying its bills? This could indicate poor cash management policies.
  • Checking the gross margins for the past several years might indicate a lack of control, price erosion or several other deficiencies.
  • Has the business used all of its bank credit lines? Does the bank or any creditor have the company on any kind of credit watch?
  • Does the company have monthly financial statements? Are the annual financials prepared on a timely basis?

Management

  • Is the owner constantly interrupted by telephone calls or demands that require immediate attention? This may indicate a business in crisis.
  • Has the business experienced a lot of management turnover over the past few years?
  • If there are any employees working in the business, do they take pride in what they do and in the business itself?

Manufacturing

  • What is the inventory turnover? Does the company have too many suppliers?
  • Is the business in a stagnant or dying market, and can it shift gears rapidly to make changes or enter new markets?

Marketing

  • Is the business introducing new products or services?
  • Is the business experiencing loss of market share, especially compared to the competition? Price increases may increase dollar sales, but the real measure is unit sales.

When business owners consider selling, it will pay big dividends for them to consider the areas listed above and make whatever changes are appropriate to deal with them. It makes good business sense to not only review them, but also to resolve as many of the issues outlined above as possible.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

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Do You Have What It Takes to Find Success in the 21st Century?

There is no doubt that the times are definitely changing. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a shift across many industries, and the simple fact is that many industries will never return to the old normal. Success in the 21st century will require a good deal of adaptation and the ability to evaluate where you stand today and where you need to be tomorrow.

Flexible Thinking

One of the cornerstones of being successful in life and in business is to embrace flexible thinking. A flexible approach to problems can lead to finding new and highly effective ways of tackling problems. Being able to find success in the 21st century is about much more than simply riding the next technological wave or trend. Instead, it is about being amongst the first to use flexible thinking to spot trends and developments ahead of the competition and exploit those developments first. Technology and the world are changing faster than ever. Being able to utilize fluid, flexible thinking to identify problems and then seek out cutting-edge solutions to those problems will be a key aspect for success in this century.

A Solid Plan

Flexible thinking is essential for success, but so is having a plan. Just as business leaders needed a plan to achieve final success two-thousand years ago, the same holds true today. In many ways, evolving technology has not reshaped basic logic. 

You’ll want your business plan to strike the right balance between being rigid and flexible. At the same time, you’ll need a solid business plan that includes specific written goals and concrete time frames.

Embracing Technology

The days of ignoring technology or “working around” it are simply gone. The modern business landscape has integrated not just digital marketing, but digital financial transactions as well. This trend is only going to become more pronounced in the coming years. 

The business landscape means understanding and embracing the fact that commerce now has a massive digital component at every level. The pandemic has served to accelerate this fact and has very likely permanently changed how business will be conducted in the future. Whether it is meeting clients or customers online for a Zoom or Skype meeting, embracing digital marketing, or a range of other changes, it is essential for business owners to recognize change and incorporate it into their business and their long-term plans.

You can try to fight the future, but in the end you will fail. Charting the right course for the future means having the right mindset and a great support team in your corner. Business Brokers and M&A Advisors are experts at helping business owners prepare their businesses for sale. Demonstrating that your business has adapted to the dynamic and ever-changing environment will help you make your business much more attractive to prospective buyers.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

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The Hidden Danger of Cross-Selling

You’ve likely heard the adage that it is far easier to cross-sell an existing customer a new product than it is to find a new customer.

And if your goal is to grow at all costs, then cross-selling makes sense.

However, all of that sales growth may not do much for the value of your company. If you cross-sell your existing customers too much stuff, it could make your business far less valuable.

When you cross-sell a customer so many things that they begin to account for more than 15–30% of your revenue, expect your value to drop. If a single customer represents more than 30% of your sales, expect an even deeper discount.

Customer concentration is one factor that makes up your score on The Switzerland Structure — one of eight drivers the folks over at The Value Builder System™ have discovered drives your business’s value in an acquirer’s eyes.

To summarize in simplistic terms, the least valuable companies focus on selling lots of stuff to a few people. The most valuable businesses do precisely the opposite: by selling less stuff to more people.

How 3D4Medical Made the Switch

As an example, let’s look at the medical technology firm 3D4Medical. Founded in 2004 by John Moore, the company built 3-D models of the human body, photographed them, and sold or licensed their images to textbook publishers.

By 2010, 3D4Medical was selling images to a handful of large publishers around the world. Then the recession hit, severely impacting the entire publishing business.

To make things worse, new generations of students increasingly wanted to learn online, rather than through textbooks. The advent of inexpensive digital photography, and the resulting increase in competition for the same customers, also didn’t help Moore.

Moore had built a successful company on a handful of customers, but when that segment began to dry up, so did his business. Despite working harder than ever, Moore’s revenue plateaued for four straight years. Instead of punching through to the next level, Moore had his hands full just keeping his company going.

But while Moore had relied on too few customers, he still had something no one else had: thousands of 3-D models of the human body.

Then Moore had an idea.

He decided to re-purpose his 3-D images into a mobile app that medical students could use on their phones. Moore expanded the idea to include professors and medical professionals, who could use his 3-D images on an individual basis to learn, teach, and share with patients and students.

By 2019, 3D4Medical had become the biggest producer of medical apps on every app store. The company boasted over 300 of the top universities in the world as clients. Their app served 1.2 million paying customers and had 25 million downloads.

Thanks to having a diverse set of customers, Moore sold 3D4Medical in 2019 for $50.6 million.

The takeaway? Customer concentration is seen as a significant risk when a potential buyer determines the value of your business. That’s why the most valuable companies are the ones that sell less stuff to more people.

 

How can you improve the value of your business?

Complete the “Value Builder” questionnaire today in just 13 minutes and we’ll send you a 27-page custom report assessing how well your business is positioned for selling. Take the test now:

Sellability Score

Why an Exit Plan is Critical When the Time Comes to Sell

By JoAnn Lombardi, President VR Business Brokers/Mergers & Acquisitions

Every business owner should have an exit plan in place. If you currently own a business, you know as every other successful entrepreneur knows that you will not be doing this forever. You want the value of the business to stay high so you can attract qualified buyers to take over ownership and expand whenever you decide it is time to sell. To ensure this happens, have an exit plan in place so you will be able to sell your business for the maximum value.

Understanding an Exit Plan

An exit plan is a series of continually evolving and interrelated plans to help ensure your business will continue to sustain and grow. When you are first putting together your exit plan, you must answer at least the following questions:

  • What are your preferred options and timing for exiting the business? For example, sale to outsider, sale or gift to family or employees, merger with a competitor, buyout by a partner, etc.
  • What family members are involved in the business and what are their objectives?
  • What are your financial objectives and retirement plans?
  • What is the value of your business now?
  • What key actions are necessary to increase business value and position it for sale?
  • What actions are necessary to manage the estate, trust, and tax issues you will face through retirement and beyond?
  • What changes in the business and what is your role needed now to preserve your quality of life and your passion for the business?

Taking the Appropriate Mearsures

This includes considering:

  • Family
  • Health
  • Goals
  • Finances
  • The Business

An exit plan should be action-oriented with implemented realistic measures. You must take a longterm approach when putting together an exit plan for your business, continually updating it, and assessing the progress of implementation against the planned timetable.

Depending on the complexity of the business, developing a comprehensive exit plan is a demanding task that generally takes 3 to 6 months to complete and as long as 2 to 4 years to implement. It will address a wide variety of intricate strategic, operational, financial, tax, human resource, and legal issues. Input should be gathered from key advisors, including your CPA, wealth planner, estate planner, business consultant, insurance broker, appraisers, and mergers and acquisitions advisor.

 

How can you improve the value of your business?

Complete the “Value Builder” questionnaire today in just 13 minutes and we’ll send you a 27-page custom report assessing how well your business is positioned for selling. Take the test now:

Sellability Score

What You Should Know About Selling Your Business

There can be no doubt that selling your business stands as one of the most complex and important decisions you’ll likely ever make. It is quite often the case that a business represents decades, or even a lifetime, of dedicated work. In this article, we’ll examine some of the key steps that you should take when it comes time to sell.

One of the most important steps that any seller can take is to begin the sales process far in advance of the date that he or she plans to put the business on the market. Working with an experienced business broker or M&A advisor (and doing so preferably years in advance) is one of the single best ways to ensure that you’ll be ready to sell your business when the time comes. It will also help you to avoid the numerous pitfalls that potentially await.

A good brokerage professional can also help identify weaknesses in your business and help you address those issues; however, this is only the beginning. Your broker can help you with everything from strategy and negotiations, maintaining confidentiality and establishing the market value of your business, to connecting you with other seasoned professionals, such as accountants and lawyers.

A third key point that all sellers should consider is their own psychology. It is vital that all sellers remain flexible in their approach to selling their business and also remain respectful of prospective buyers. It is important that you put yourself in the shoes of your buyer and try to think of what they will need to feel confident in their decision. 

The right seller psychology is also absolutely essential. Sellers should not attempt to rush or force a sale or overprice their business. In short, you need to keep “your head in the game” and as much as possible, keep your emotions out of the process. 

Sellers also need to realize that the statistics strongly indicate that seller financing is likely. Only 75% of sellers ultimately receive their asking price, and businesses that are listed as “all cash” generally don’t sell. Reasonable sales terms will greatly increase the chances of successfully selling a business. It is common that sellers fail to realize just how much interest they can generate by financing the sale of their business. A reasonable down payment is also another way to improve the odds of selling a business. Being willing to offer financing makes a clear statement to a prospective buyer that you believe in the business and its ability to generate revenue. From a buyer’s perspective an “all cash” demand can be a red flag.

At the end of the day, an open mind and steady temperament will increase your chances of selling. You may want to sell your business and completely move on to new things. But the reality of selling a business is such that “walking away” may not be feasible. Transitioning your business into the hands of a new owner is usually more of an ongoing process than a “sign on the dotted line and receive a check” type of situation. Understanding this fact, and working closely with a business broker or M&A advisor in advance of selling your business, will help to streamline the sales process and greatly improve your chances of a successful outcome.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

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5 Tips for Dealing with Customer Complaints

Companies of all sizes frequently fail to handle customer complaints appropriately.  In the digital era, where complaints can be seen by hundreds, thousands or go viral to millions, it is essential that customer complaints, especially serious ones or ones backed by considerable emotion, are treated seriously and dealt with in a timely manner.

If you are failing to provide good customer service, this should be corrected.  After all, offering decent customer service is neither costly nor overly complicated.  At its core, good customer service can be reduced down to listening to the customer, letting the customer know that his or her complaint has been acknowledged and cataloged, and then working to remedy the situation if possible. 

A good positive attitude and staying calm when dealing with irritated or dissatisfied customers can go a long way towards keeping a customer happy and halting them from expressing their feelings in an online public forum.  Let’s look at five tips for dealing with customer complaints in an effective manner.

Tip #1 – Take a Proactive Stance 

A good attitude and a proactive stance can go a very long way towards diffusing an unhappy or angry customer.  A disappointed customer wants to know that he or she is being heard and that steps are being taken to remedy their situation.  Clearly communicating that you are working to fix the situation and doing so in a positive manner will diffuse most negative customer scenarios.

Tip #2 – Take Quick Action to Fix the Problem

Once a customer is calm and is feeling a little better about your company, there is still more work to do.  When you state that a problem will be addressed, it is essential that the problem is indeed addressed.  This is vitally important for the reputation of your company.  A failure to follow up on a promise to fix a situation could actually backfire and leave customers feeling as though they were initially manipulated.

Tip #3 – Always Stay Calm

If a customer is unhappy enough to write an email or post a negative review online, then they are obviously displeased.  However, if a customer is angry enough to pick up the phone and call, you can be fairly certain that the customer in question is rather upset.  This anger may boil over on the phone call. That’s why customer service people need to be ready to deal with that anger in a calm and collected fashion.  Customer service team members or salespeople should never match the anger of a customer.  Instead, they should focus on demonstrating that they are committed to fixing the problem.  It may benefit you to invest in employee training so that employees are ready to deal with angry or disappointed customers when the time arrives.

Tip #4 – Look for Customer Dissatisfaction Problem Patterns

If the same complaints and issues come up again and again, then it is very likely that there is a larger problem that must be addressed.  Numerous customer complaints from different customers shouldn’t be treated as a “headache.”  Instead, it should be viewed as a great opportunity to improve your goods and/or services.  Once you have detected a negative customer service pattern, be sure that you and your team move quickly to remedy the problem.  Your business will be stronger for doing so in the long run.

Tip #5 – Track Your Success

It is important to never assume that you have successfully addressed customer service issues until customers have, in fact, verified that the situation is resolved.  For this reason, it is wise to follow up with customers and ask for feedback via either questionnaires in the mail, email follow ups, or even phone calls.

Customer complaints that are not appropriately addressed can fester and become larger problems.  The time, effort, and money you invest in boosting the quality of your customer service team will yield significant positive results for the long-term.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

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The Top Ten Ways to Avoid Wrecking a Deal

Finalizing a deal is usually a complex process, and there is a good deal of room for error, misunderstandings, miscalculations, and good old-fashioned wild cards.  That is why it is critical to carefully think through the deal process well in advance.  In this article, we’re going to explore the top ten steps you can take to avoid wrecking a good deal.

  1. Confidentiality – At the top of our “how not to wreck a deal list” is confidentiality.  It is vital that everyone involved in the deal takes steps to avoid a breach.  Experienced business brokers are experts at maintaining confidentiality.
  2. Flexibility  – The second tip on our list is to be flexible. A lack of flexibility can absolutely destroy a deal. You shouldn’t go into a deal expecting to have all of your terms met.
  3. Be Open to Negotiations – Just as it is critical to be flexible, it is also important to embrace the concept of negotiation.  Sellers are used to being their own bosses, but when it comes to successfully selling a business, no factor is quite as important as a willingness to negotiate.
  4. Advance Preparation – Next on our list of musts to avoid wrecking a deal is to prepare for the sale well in advance.  Sellers will want to make sure that they have several years of records as well as legal and accounting documentation ready and well-prepared.  You can be 100% certain that any serious buyer will want to see your records and take a look at your financials.
  5. A Reasonable Selling Price – An inflated price will decrease the number of buyers that take a serious look at a business.  Additionally, an unreasonable price may make a seller look uninformed.  Business brokers and M&A advisors are experts at handling valuations.  One of the single best ways to boost your chances of finalizing a sale is to establish a fair and justifiable price for your business.
  6. Maintain Operations – Far too often sellers lose track of the day-to-day operations once their business goes on the market.  It is absolutely vital that sellers continue operating their business as though it may never sell.  The bottom line is that it can take months, or even years to sell.  The last thing any seller wants is for their business to lose value when they are in the process of trying to sell.
  7. Keep up the Momentum – A lack of momentum can kill a deal.  Working with a business broker or M&A advisor is an easy way to make sure you maintain momentum throughout the process.
  8. Consider Your Buyer’s Needs – Serious buyers will need a variety of information from sellers in order to obtain financing.  You can expect buyers to need appraisals of assets, information on environmental regulations, and more.  Sellers should have this kind of key information ready and waiting.
  9. Encourage Competition – Another great way to avoid wrecking a deal is to achieve leverage via buyer competition.  In general, it is a good idea to create a competitive situation – one in which prospective buyers know that there is more than one interested party.  Brokerage industry professionals understand the delicacies of presenting this information.
  10.  Seller Participation – Finally, sellers must stay involved in the entire process, and that includes being willing to assist during the transition. Showing a willingness to help during the transition period will help to foster goodwill and trust.

There are many reasons why a deal could potentially fall apart.  You may not be able to control every single variable, but by following the ten key tips outlined in this article, you will be well on your way to increasing your chances of successfully completing a deal.

Copyright: Business Brokerage Press, Inc.

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